East Suffolk Council - Waveney Local Plan (Adopted March 2019)

Strategy for the Lowestoft Area

New homes in Lowestoft

Total

Homes Built 2014-2017

355

Existing Housing Commitments4

1,568

Homes allocated in Local Plan expected to be delivered in plan period

3,283

Total Growth 2014-2036

5,206

4 Sites with planning permission or on Local Development Framework allocations which are expected to complete before 2036. This does not include sites with planning permission on allocations which have been rolled forward into this Local Plan such as the Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood site.

2.1 The Lowestoft area comprises Lowestoft and the parishes of Carlton Colville, Corton, Gisleham, Oulton and Oulton Broad. The Lowestoft area is expected to accommodate the majority of the District's development over the next 20 years. The key focus of the Local Plan is to continue the promotion of regeneration in Central Lowestoft and expand it to include coastal areas of the town and beyond to Corton. Regeneration in Central and Coastal Lowestoft will deliver a significant amount of new housing as well as new economic development including new industry, retail and leisure. However, there will be a need for the town to expand outwards to accommodate new housing and employment land development.

2.2 In total, land has been allocated in this Local Plan for over 4,000 new homes in the Lowestoft area. This is in addition to the 1,568 which currently have planning permission. However, not all of the 4,000 homes allocated will be delivered within the plan period. Over the plan period, in total, it is expected that the Lowestoft area will grow by 5,206 new homes. Lowestoft is expected to take the largest share of new jobs created over the next 20 years. The Local Plan allocates 38 hectares of new employment land. However, it is unlikely that all of this employment land will be delivered within the plan period.

2.3 When looking at the physical expansion of the urban area of Lowestoft there are a number of constraints to growth. The town can only grow on a north-south axis due to the North Sea to the east and the Broads to the west. The northern and particularly the southern extremes of the town are now some distance from the town centre and therefore there are limits on how much further the town can grow sustainably outwards. As such new development needs to be of a scale which can deliver new services and facilities. A further issue is to manage and limit coalescence of the town with surrounding villages such as Blundeston, Corton, Gisleham, Hopton (in Norfolk) and Kessingland to ensure each settlement retains its individual identity.

2.4 A further constraint is that much of the land surrounding Lowestoft is high grade agricultural land. Much of the land to the south of the town being the highest grade, Grade 1 agricultural land. The landscape to much of the north of the town is also particularly sensitive to development, with the exception of the sites allocated for development.

2.5 Considering the above, the focus for development on the edge of the town is to deliver a mix of strategic scale developments and a number of smaller scale housing and employment developments to support the town.

2.6 A strategic new development to the north of the town (in the parish of Corton), the North of Lowestoft Garden Village (Policy WLP2.13) will deliver a significant amount of new housing over the longer term, supported by essential community facilities. These extra community facilities will be of significant benefit to the population of Corton whilst retaining the character and identity of the existing settlement. The site will also deliver employment land where the demand is greatest due to the sub-regional linkages with Great Yarmouth. To the south of the town another strategic development (Policy WLP2.16) is proposed which will deliver a new, more centrally located primary school for Carlton Colville, parking for the existing primary school in the short term, a country park and flood risk mitigation in line with the Lowestoft Flood Risk Management Project.

2.7 Due to its proximity to the European protected sites, the growth in Lowestoft will require mitigation and planning applications will require project level Habitat Regulations Assessment. More details are found in Policy WLP8.34.

Infrastructure

2.8 To deliver and support the growth plans outlined within this section the following new and improved infrastructure will be required.

Transport

  • Lake Lothing Third Crossing
  • Improvements to Bloodmoor Roundabout
  • Servicing and Access improvements to Enterprise Zones
  • Other traffic management and pinch-point works following completion of the Third Crossing
  • Pedestrian and Cycle Bridge over Lake Lothing at Brooke Peninsula (including new bridge over railway line to Normanston Park)
  • Pedestrian and cycle path between Corton and Hopton
  • Improvements to the cycle network as identified in the Waveney Cycle Strategy
  • Improvements to Lowestoft Station

Education

  • New 2 form entry primary school on the Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood site (Policy WLP2.4)
  • New 2 form entry primary school (including pre-school) on the North of Lowestoft Garden Village site (Policy WLP2.13)
  • New 2 form entry primary school (including pre-school) on Land south of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham (Policy WLP2.16)
  • Expansion of existing primary schools in north Lowestoft to accommodate 85 pupils
  • New pre-school setting on North of Lowestoft Garden Village (Policy WLP2.13)
  • New pre-school settings in the Carlton Colville, Kirkley and Whitton, Oulton, Gunton and Corton Wards
  • Extensions to secondary schools in north Lowestoft to accommodate 133 pupils

Health Care

  • New medical centre on Woods Meadow, Oulton and extensions to other surgeries in the town

Community Facilities

  • New library in Oulton Broad and other improvements to library provision
  • New community centre in Carlton Colville and on the North of Lowestoft Garden Village

Green Infrastructure

  • New sports facilities at Oakes Farm (Policy WLP2.19)
  • New allotments on Monckton Avenue and on Land south of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham (Policy WLP2.16)
  • Country park on Land south of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham (Policy WLP2.16)
  • Improvements to tennis courts and bowling greens
  • New changing facility at Normanston Park
  • New parks and play spaces on all development allocations

Flood Risk

  • Lowestoft Flood Risk Management Project - including flood mitigation at Land south of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham (Policy WLP2.16)

Utilities

  • Localised improvements to the sewerage network

Central and Coastal Lowestoft Regeneration

2.9 Lowestoft has long been identified as a priority area for regeneration. As discussed above, the town faces significant challenges with issues relating to poor economic performance and high levels of deprivation. These issues are at their most acute within the central parts of the town. It is these parts of the town which also have the greatest potential for positive transformation.

2.10 Central and Coastal Lowestoft benefits from the town centre, port, the beach and Broads, extensive areas of waterfront, a rich historic environment and good public transport links. It also benefits from substantial redevelopment opportunities on former industrial sites which are currently underutilised or derelict. Central Lowestoft will also experience significant change over this plan period with the planned Third Crossing over Lake Lothing and strategic flood protection measures.

2.11 To address the need for regeneration the last Local Plan included an Area Action Plan (2012) for the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour area of Central Lowestoft. This development plan document provided a spatial policy framework for revitalisation of the area. It included specific policies to manage and support development of the area, together with specific site allocations for the development of different parts of the area. The plan set out to provide 1,585 new homes, new industry and new retail and leisure facilities.

2.12 Progress has been made on many of the allocations in the Area Action Plan. Planning permissions have been granted for 1,181 new homes on the Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood site. New offices have been constructed on Riverside Road. Existing engineering businesses have expanded in the PowerPark and East Anglia ONE and Galloper windfarms have announced investment in the town.

2.13 However, there is still more work to be done. This Local Plan replaces the Area Action Plan in its entirety. However, it carries forward many of the proposals in order to ensure a planned approach to the regeneration of Central Lowestoft is achieved. This Local Plan also widens the scope by considering how the existing regeneration proposals fit with the wider part of Central Lowestoft including the town centre and the coast from Corton to South Beach.

  • 1 Improve connections and permeability within the area. Including ensuring the third crossing supports connections through central Lowestoft and to the town centre, creating better pedestrian and cycle connections between the Broads, East of England Park and North Denes and South Beach through to Pakefield.
  • 2 Create a better relationship to the waterfront, particularly along the south side of Lake Lothing.
  • 3 Support Lowestoft Port and capitalise on the growth of offshore renewables and offshore related engineering.
  • 4 Enhance the vitality and viability of Lowestoft Town Centre.
  • 5 Bring back underutilised and derelict land into positive use.
  • 6 Enhance the tourism offer of the area.
  • 7 Enhance the quality of design, the public realm and the historic environment, particularly around the Historic High Street.
  • 8 Deliver new housing in an accessible location bringing a better mix of tenures and types of housing to the area.
  • 9 Reduce the need to travel by car.
  • 10 Improve the natural, historic and built environmental quality of the area.


2.14 To deliver these high level objectives, the plan and table below identify the main themed opportunity areas, the links between them and the overall spatial objectives for those areas. For some areas specific site allocations are identified, many of these are rolled forward from the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan. It is expected that development proposals should be broadly in line with the spatial objectives for each themed opportunity area. Any Neighbourhood Plans and Neighbourhood Development Orders prepared in Lowestoft or Oulton Broad, provide an opportunity to add further detail to these high level objectives and identify further specific development proposals to deliver them. A strategy for the town centre area (including the following themed areas; Retail Core and Enhanced Leisure Area, Peto Square Leisure Area, Historic High Street and Scores, Office and Town Centre Services Area and Town Centre Residential Area) is also being prepared which will provide further detail including land-use and non-planning measures to help improve the vitality and viability of the town centre. Planning measures identified in the strategy could be adopted through a Neighbourhood Plan or a Supplementary Planning Document.

2.15 For some areas there are specific proposals and policies in this Local Plan which will help deliver these spatial objectives. Figure 6 shows sites proposed for allocation in Central Lowestoft. These specific allocations together with other site specific designations are covered in this section under Policies WLP2.2 to WLP2.12. Policies WLP8.1/8.2/8.4 on housing, Policy WLP8.12 Existing Employment Areas, Policies WLP8.15, WLP8.16 and WLP8.17 on tourism, Policies WLP8.18/8.19 on town centres, Policy WLP8.23 Protection of Open Space and Policy WLP8.39 Conservation Areas also help deliver the objectives for Central and Coastal Lowestoft.

Figure 6 - Central and Coastal Lowestoft strategy

Figure 6

1|North Denes and Beyond Tourism and Ecological Area Enhance the tourism offer, protect and enhance the existing open space and protect and enhance the sensitive biodiversity habitats around Gunton Warren. Relevant Policies: WLP8.15 - New Self Catering Tourist Accommodation, WLP8.23 - Protection of Open Space and WLP8.34 - Biodiversity and Geodiversity.

2|East of England Parks Enhance the open space comprising the East of England Park, Ness Point and the links between the nearby parks. Relevant Policies: WLP2.5 - East of England Park and WLP8.23 - Protection of Open Space.

3|Historic High Street and Scores Enhance the heritage experience and support the existing shops, cafés and restaurants which support the local population. Links between the Historic High Street, the Scores and the East of England Park will also be enhanced. Relevant Policies: WLP2.9 - Historic High Street and Scores, WLP8.18 - New Town Centre Use Development, WLP8.19 - Vitality and Viability of Town Centres, WLP8.37 - Historic Environment, WLP8.38 - Non-Designated Heritage Assets, and WLP8.39 - Conservation Areas.

4|Town Centre Residential Area Support further residential development which will help support the shops and services provided by the town centre. Lowestoft hospital will be developed for residential uses whilst securing conservation of heritage assets within the site. Relevant Policies: WLP2.8 -Former Lowestoft Hospital.

5|Office and Town Centre Services Area Retain and support the office and service function of the area. Relevant Policies: WLP8.18 - New Town Centre Use Development.

6|Retail Core and Enhanced Leisure Area Expand and enhance the retail and leisure offer including multiplex cinema and restaurants. Relevant Policies: WLP2.7 - Former Battery Green Car Park, WLP8.18 - New Town Centre Use Development, WLP8.19 - Vitality and Viability of Town Centres.

7|PowerPark Continue to promote the creation of a cluster of businesses in the offshore renewables, engineering and oil and gas sectors. Relevant Policies: WLP2.2 - PowerPark.

8|Peto Square Leisure Area Promote growth of leisure uses such as public houses and restaurants. Relevant Policies: WLP2.3 - Peto Square, WLP8.18 - New Town Centre Use Development, WLP8.19 - Vitality and Viability of Town Centres.

10|South Beach Tourism Focus Support proposals which enhance the tourism offer and ensure that the seafront remains an attractive high-quality environment for residents and tourists alike. Relevant Policies: WLP8.15 - New Self Catering Tourist Accommodation, WLP8.16 - New Hotels and Guest Houses, WLP8.17 - Existing Tourist Accommodation.

11 |Kirkley Village Centre Protect and enhance the existing retail area and expand the provision of restaurants and cafés to cater for local people and tourists alike. Enhance the links to the seafront, so the area can greater benefit from tourists. Relevant Policies: WLP2.12 - Kirkley District Shopping Centre.

12 |Kirkley Rise Employment Area Retain employment uses in either the existing buildings or through redevelopment. Relevant Policies: WLP8.12 - Existing Employment Areas.

13 |Lothing Park Existing Retail Area Continue to improve the appearance of this key gateway to the town to encourage greater movement between this area and the town centre. Relevant Policies: WLP8.21 - Sustainable Transport, WLP8.29 - Design.

14 |Lake Lothing Third Crossing Support the plans for the third crossing over Lake Lothing and ensure the crossing is a success bringing significant benefits to the town and District. Relevant Policies: WLP1.3 - Infrastructure.

15 |Inner Harbour Port Area Protect and support the enhancement of port related activities, particularly those which support the growing offshore renewables and engineering sectors. Relevant Policies: WLP2.10 - Inner Harbour Port Area.

16 |High Quality Connections between the Seafront and the Broads Establish a waterfront pedestrian and cycle route which links the seafront to the broads. Relevant Policies: WLP2.4 - Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood, WLP2.6 - Western End of Lake Lothing, WLP8.21 - Sustainable Transport.

17 |Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood It is expected that this area will deliver 1,400 new homes, community facilities, new employment premises including better public access to the waterfront. The site will benefit from a third river crossing and pedestrian/cycle crossing. Relevant Policies: WLP2.4 - Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood.

18 |Pedestrian and Cycle Crossing Ensure the delivery of this key pedestrian and cycle link between Brooke Peninsula and Normanston Park. Relevant Policies: WLP1.3 - Infrastructure, WLP2.4 - Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood, WLP8.21 - Sustainable Transport.

19 |Harbour Road Maritime Employment Area Protect existing premises in employment use and support the development of new employment premises connected to maritime industries. Relevant Policies: WLP8.12 - Existing Employment Areas.

20|Western End of LakeLothing Create a more mixed-use area, including new employment and tourism uses associated with maritime activities and new residential development. Relevant Policies: WLP2.6 - Western End of Lake Lothing.

22 |Denmark Road Corridor Promote enhancements to this corridor as one of the main gateways to the town centre. Promote the regeneration of brownfield sites for employment uses. Relevant Policies: WLP1.3 - Infrastructure, WLP8.12 - Existing Employment Areas, WLP8.21 - Sustainable Transport.

21 |Oulton Broad Shopping and Leisure Area Protect and enhance the existing retail and leisure offer in Oulton Broad. Specific proposals include the redevelopment of Oswald's Boatyard for a residential, library and café development. Relevant Policies: WLP2.11 - Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre.

 

Figure 7 - Central and Coastal Lowestoft allocations and designations
Figure 7

© Crown copyright [and database rights] 2019 OS100042052

2.16 Large parts of the area around Lake Lothing are at risk from flooding as identified in the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Level 1 and Level 2 (2018). The National Planning Policy Framework states that Local Plans should use a sequential test to steer new development to areas with lowest probability of flooding. However, the Framework also states that if it is not consistent with wider sustainability objectives to do this, development can be allocated in areas at risk from flooding, providing the exception test is passed which ensures development is safe from flooding for its lifetime. It is considered that the sustainability benefits of regenerating Central Lowestoft outweigh the potential flood risk of this area. The Core Strategy (2009) and the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan (2012) applied the sequential test and exceptions test to the regeneration of Lake Lothing and justified the delivery of 1,500 homes, employment, retail and leisure development in this location. It is considered that the roll forward of these regeneration objectives into this Local Plan also meet those requirements. Individual proposals on regeneration sites will need to follow the sequential approach within the site and be subject to a site-specific flood risk assessment and accompanied by a flood evacuation plan which will demonstrate the development will remain safe in the event of a flood.

Policy WLP2.1 - Central and Coastal Lowestoft Regeneration

The Council will work with partners including Suffolk County Council, Lowestoft Town Council, Oulton Broad Parish Council, Associated British Ports, the Environment Agency, Network Rail, the Marine Management Organisation, the Broads Authority, landowners and local businesses to deliver the objectives for Central and Coastal Lowestoft and the specific objectives identified for the main themed opportunity areas.

Proposals for development within Lowestoft and Oulton Broad should contribute to the objectives for Central and Coastal Lowestoft and the specific objectives identified for the main themed opportunity areas. Proposals for development within main themed opportunity areas should be in conformity with the objectives for that area.

Neighbourhood Plans, Area Action Plans or Supplementary Planning Documents should be prepared to add further detail to the objectives and specific proposals in this Local Plan.

PowerPark

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Employment development

2.17 There is huge potential for growth in Waveney associated with the development of offshore wind farms as evidenced in the Employment Land Needs Assessment (2016) and the Assessment of Land Requirements to Support Offshore Energy and Engineering in Waveney (2018). The East Anglia Array which is located just off the coast of Lowestoft will be one of the largest wind farms in the world with a capacity of up to 7GW. The first phase of this scheme has consent and the Outer Harbour which forms part of the PowerPark has been chosen as the construction management and operations and maintenance base for the phase. The second phase is now being considered for consent and four further phases are being progressed to planning. In total it is estimated that at least 1,500 new direct and indirect jobs will be created in Waveney as a result of these developments.

2.18 In addition to offshore wind, there are also opportunities for growth from other offshore related sectors, including oil and gas and other offshore renewables. The Outer Harbour is also home to the Lowestoft fishing industry. The fishing industry also has the potential for growth as noted in the Assessment of Land Requirements to Support Offshore Energy and Engineering in Waveney (2018).

2.19 The PowerPark Demand and Need Report (BVG Associates, 2009) identified that the PowerPark is well placed to capitalise on growth in the offshore energy sector. The study advised that a mix of energy sectors including offshore wind, offshore research and development, and marine engineering will deliver the maximum economic and employment benefit from the PowerPark. Responding to this, the Area Action Plan identified the site as the main focus for a cluster of offshore related businesses. This Local Plan continues this approach as the more recent evidence in the Employment Land Needs Assessment (2016) and the Assessment of Land Requirements to Support Offshore Energy and Engineering in Waveney (2018) continue to support this.

2.20 The land allocated as the PowerPark by Policy WLP2.2 includes land both within and outside the statutory Port of Lowestoft as shown on the Policies Map.

2.21 The allocation borders the East Inshore Marine Plan area. The policy helps support the objectives of the East Marine Plan and is consistent with East Marine Plan policies EC3 and WIND1 and WIND2. These policies and the objectives of the East Marine Plan should be considered in developing proposals in this area.

2.22 The PowerPark is already home to a number of offshore related companies including Greater Gabbard Wind Farm, East Anglia Offshore Wind and Sembmarine SLP. The PowerPark is also home to OrbisEnergy which provides office space for businesses focused on the energy sector. The objective for this site is to further enhance this cluster through new development and redevelopment and re-use of existing premises within the site. There is limited vacant land available within the site for new development, so most development will involve the redevelopment or re-use of existing premises. The Council has prepared a relocation strategy and will continue to support and facilitate existing businesses operating in the area that are not in the energy sector to relocate to other areas within the town. Additional employment land has been allocated by Policies WLP2.13 and WLP2.18 in north Lowestoft which could accommodate businesses wishing to relocate.

2.23 The site includes part of both the North Lowestoft and South Lowestoft Conservation Areas. Therefore proposals should have regard to the National Planning Policy Framework with respect to conservation areas and the local provisions set out in Policy WLP8.39 of this Local Plan. The site also contains some non-designated heritage assets. Careful consideration should be given to the significance of these heritage assets and any potential harm from development in line with Policy WLP8.37. Where possible these assets should be retained as part of new development. Proposals should have regard to WLP8.38 Non-Designated Heritage Assets.

Policy WLP2.2 - PowerPark

Land comprising the PowerPark (23.37 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for employment development (use classes B1, B2 and B8) and port related development. Associated and ancillary uses necessary to support the offshore energy and engineering sectors will also be permitted.

Proposals involving the redevelopment or change of use of existing premises, to uses not falling within the uses allocated in the paragraph above will not be permitted.

The Council will work with Suffolk County Council, Associated British Ports, the Environment Agency, the Marine Management Organisation and landowners where practicable to:

  • Improve the general appearance of the site through improvements to the public realm, landscaping improvements and on-site branding.
  • Improve cycle and pedestrian connectivity to and through the site and ensure sufficient car parking is available.
  • Provide wayfinding and orientation facilities including signposting to the town centre, the Scores, the historic High Street, the East of England Park and Ness Point.
  • Improve the visibility and appearance of the waterfront. This should include improvements to the current fencing treatment and ensure proposed flood walls are attractive and allow for visibility of the waterfront.

New development and redevelopment within the site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • Provision should be made for cyclists including covered secure cycle parking and showering facilities for employees.
  • Development should avoid and if necessary mitigate any impact on the Outer Harbour Kittiwake Colony and Ness Point County Wildlife Site. A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning applications.
  • Proposals should respect the cultural heritage of the area and ensure where possible buildings which are non-designated heritage assets are retained as part of any redevelopment.
  • All new development will be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. A flood evacuation plan and details of mitigation measures to the satisfaction of the Council's Emergency Planners must be submitted with any planning applications.

New development next to, opposite, or in close proximity to the PowerPark should ensure potential conflicts are mitigated through the layout, use and environmental credentials of new buildings. Developers should liaise with businesses and port operators to ensure that potential conflicting uses are addressed prior to any application for planning permission. New development should not result in unreasonable restrictions being placed on the operations of the port or existing businesses within the PowerPark.

Peto Square

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Mixed use including restaurants, drinking establishments and leisure uses

2.24 The area around Station Square to the north of the Bascule Bridge provides a key gateway to the town with a historic townscape which benefits from a conservation area and a number of listed and locally listed buildings including the Grade II listed Customs House (known as 'Port House' on the National Heritage List for England), the Tuttles Building and the Railway Station.

2.25 The area contains a number of secondary town centre related service, retail and catering businesses but suffers from the effects of through traffic on the A47/A12. It is expected that the effects of traffic in this location will be reduced once the planned third vehicular crossing is in place. The delivery of the third crossing is therefore essential to improving the general amenity and therefore the attractiveness of this area and the town centre as a whole to the market.

2.26 The Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan proposed this area to be the focus of new retail development in the town. However, this involved longer term proposals to move the station. This now looks unlikely to be achieved and the overall need for retail development across the District is now smaller than previously forecasted. However, there is still potential for significant improvements to be made in this location and potential for new development which will support the town centre and complement the existing cluster of leisure uses in the locality. The Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment (2016) states that Peto Square has the potential to accommodate significant new retail, leisure and mixed use development over the medium to long term.

2.27 The planned strategic flood defence measures which form part of the Lowestoft Flood Risk Management Project will have the effect of protecting this site from flooding in the current 1 in 200 year event. As such there may be scope over the plan period for development defined by national planning policy as 'more vulnerable' such as hotels, drinking establishments and houses to take place in this area.

2.28 Policy WLP2.3 continues to allocate the area around Station Square and the Custom House for leisure and retail uses. Providing flood risk issues are overcome the policy recognises the potential for hotel development and residential development in this area. The main objectives of the policy are to support and enhance the town centre, improve the general appearance of the area and protect the areas valuable heritage. There is uncertainty at present as to the amount of development which could be accommodated on this site and when it could be delivered. As such any development delivered on the site will be in addition to the targets set out in Policy WLP1.1.

2.29 The site is adjacent to the Inner Harbour Port Area. In line with Policy WLP2.10, development should be designed to minimise conflicts between land uses in the allocation and the port area and ensure development does not result in unreasonable restrictions being placed on the operations of the port or existing businesses within the Inner Harbour Port area.

2.30 To guide development in this sensitive location a development brief in the form of a Supplementary Planning Document or as part of a Neighbourhood Plan will be prepared.

Policy WLP2.3 - Peto Square

Land comprising Peto Square (5.8 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for mixed-use development including restaurants (use class A3), drinking establishments (use class A4) leisure uses (use class D2) and retail (use class A1).

Once strategic flood defence measures are in place residential and hotel development will be supported on this site as part of mixed use developments subject to a site specific flood risk assessment demonstrating the development will be safe in accordance with the Exceptions test.

The Council will work with Suffolk County Council, Associated British Ports, Network Rail, the Environment Agency, landowners and local businesses to:

  • Reduce the impact of traffic on the site as part of the measures associated with the third vehicular crossing of Lake Lothing.
  • Improve the visibility and appearance of the waterfront. This should include improvements to the current fencing and ensure proposed flood walls are attractive and allow for visibility of the waterfront.
  • Improve facilities and the appearance of the railway station, including bringing vacant parts of the station back in to use.
  • Improve pedestrian and cycle links to the seafront.

New development and redevelopment within the site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • The Custom House and surrounding area should be sympathetically brought back into active use. The space between the Custom House and the waterfront should be developed as a high quality public space.
  • Development should preserve and enhance the character of the conservation area.
  • New public realm treatments should be consistent with the existing areas of public realm at Royal Plain and Station Square.
  • Development should facilitate improved pedestrian connections through the site.
  • All new development will be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. A flood evacuation plan and details of mitigation measures to the satisfaction of the Council's Emergency Planners must be submitted with any planning application.

A Neighbourhood Plan or Supplementary Planning Document should be prepared to provide further detail on how the site should be developed

Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood

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Mixed use including residential development, employment development, primary school, playing field and local retail centre

2.31 The mixed use redevelopment of the south side of Lake Lothing has the potential to transform Lowestoft and raise the profile of the town. The vision for this site is to transform it into a vibrant, inclusive community that is integrated with adjacent areas and provides access to employment, services and facilities in a high quality environment which maximises the opportunities presented by the waterfront. Kirkley Waterfront and the proposed Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood comprise predominantly underutilised or underused brownfield land on the south bank of Lake Lothing between Riverside Road and Stanley Road. The site was originally allocated in the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan for 1,380 new homes and associated community uses and new employment development.

2.32 The site covers some 60 hectares. Figure 8 shows the different parts of the site.

Figure 8 - Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood site

figure 8

© Crown copyright [and database rights] 2019 OS100042052

2.33 Much progress has already been made towards the regeneration of this area. Outline planning permission has been granted for 1,180 new homes, new retail centre, and leisure facilities, a playing field and a 1.5 form entry primary school. In the Riverside Road area, new offices have been constructed for Essex and Suffolk Water and Waveney District Council and Suffolk County Council. However, the Jeld Wen Factory site remains underutilised and a long lease on the site means it may not be available for redevelopment until the early 2020s. As such Policy WLP2.4 continues to allocate this area for mixed use development, with the objective of achieving a comprehensive approach to the delivery of 1,380 new homes and new employment development. Should the existing permission for the primary school lapse, new permissions will require sufficient land for a 2 form entry primary school to reflect changing requirements.

2.34 The planned third vehicular crossing of Lake Lothing will traverse the eastern part of the site providing better north-south connections and further helping to stimulate regeneration in the area. A pedestrian and cycle bridge at Brooke Peninsula connecting to Normanston Park is also proposed which will further help reduce the need to travel by car. This pedestrian and cycle bridge will provide the site with access to a multi-functional open space at Normanston Park which reduces the amount of open space needed on the site and enhance its deliverability. The pedestrian and cycle bridge will be an opening bridge in order to minimise impact on navigation. The regeneration of the site is also likely to significantly benefit from the planned strategic flood defence measures for Lake Lothing.

2.35 Most of the residential development on the site should be provided in the west of the site including on the former Sanyo site, the Brooke Business Park and Jeld Wen Playing Fields, the former SCA Recycling Site, and the former Witham Paints Factory site. This area generally has less probability of flooding. This part of the site is currently accessed from School Road and Heath Road. These roads are not considered suitable for accommodating the entire amount of residential development on the site. A new access road is required through the site from Waveney Drive to service these developments. The construction of this access road will likely result in the loss of a small area of the Brooke Yachts and Jeld Wen Mosaic County Wildlife Site. Parts of the County Wildlife Site support good populations of common lizard, however, much of the site is of poorer quality and heavily overgrown limiting its habitat value for lizards. The area of County Wildlife Site likely to be lost to accommodate the access road is largely overgrown. To mitigate this impact the remaining County Wildlife Site area should be enhanced to support an increased level of biodiversity and enhanced habitat for common lizards and other priority species.

2.36 Given the recent uses on the site, there is a risk of ground contamination. Therefore, a full site investigation report should be submitted with any planning application which includes reports on intrusive surveys, a risk assessment and remediation method statement.

2.37 Waveney has an ageing population and the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (2017) identified a significant need for new sheltered and extra care housing and new care homes. This large site, which will likely be delivered by a number of developers provides an opportunity to deliver a retirement community comprising a care home and/or a proportion of extra care/sheltered dwellings. These will form part of the total housing allocated on the site. The development should be designed utilising dementia friendly design principles (see Policy WLP8.31 on Lifetime Design).

2.38 New employment development on the site should be focused along the waterfront of the former Jeld Wen Factory site. This area has a higher risk of flooding and is therefore less suitable for residential development. The waterfront is also valuable for employment development which could support the offshore wind and engineering sectors and supplement the proposals at the PowerPark. There are a small number of existing businesses operating out of Brooke Business Park. The outline planning permission for this site promotes residential development over much of the Brooke Business Park. The Council will support existing businesses to help them relocate. The Council will also support and require the continued use of the slipways at Brooke Peninsula by local people and businesses as part of the development.

2.39 The development of the area should exhibit exceptional urban design. It should score particularly well against Building for Life criteria (see Policy WLP8.29). Developers are encouraged to seek Built for Life Quality Mark for housing development on the site.

2.40 The site is opposite to the Inner Harbour Port Area. In line with Policy WLP2.10, development should be designed to minimise conflicts between land uses in the allocation and the port area and ensure development does not result in unreasonable restrictions being placed on the operations of the port or existing businesses within the Inner Harbour Port area.

2.41 A Development Brief for the site has been adopted as a Supplementary Planning Document. The brief provides further detail to guide the development of the site and planning applications for development on the site should be in accordance with the guidance and the outline masterplan detailed in the brief. The Development Brief will be kept under review and may be amended in line with Policy WLP2.4 to take into account changing circumstances. This review could take place through a revised Supplementary Planning Document or as part of a Neighbourhood Plan.

Policy WLP2.4 - Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood

Land comprising the Kirkley Waterfront and Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood (59.76 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for mixed use development including:

  • Approximately 1,380 new dwellings;
  • Retirement community comprising a care home/nursing home and extra care and/or sheltered dwellings;
  • 2 form entry primary school and a pre-school setting (2.2 hectares);
  • Playing field;
  • Local retail centre comprising a mix of convenience retail, cafés and other local services;
  • Marina facilities; and
  • Approximately 7.5 hectares of employment development (falling under use classes B1, B2 or B8) and/or port related development fronting Lake Lothing.

Residential development should be predominantly located to the west of the site including on the former Sanyo site, the Brooke Business Park and Jeld Wen Playing Fields, the former SCA Recycling Site and the former Witham Paints Factory site.

The primary school, playing field and local centre should be located centrally within the residential development around the main access road.

New employment development/redevelopment (falling under use classes B1, B2 or B8) should provide sufficient and appropriate space to meet identified needs and demand. Employment development should be focused on the waterfront area of the former Jeld Wen Factory Site and the Riverside Road area. Proposals involving the redevelopment or change of use of existing employment premises on Riverside Road, Lowestoft Enterprise Park and Quayside Business Centre, falling within Use Classes B1, B2 or B8, for uses not falling within Use Classes B1, B2 or B8 will only be permitted where development is part of or ancillary to the Lake Lothing Third Crossing project or where:

  • Marketing evidence is provided which demonstrates the premises have been marketed for a sustained period of 12 months in accordance with the requirements set out in Appendix 4; and
  • The proposed use is compatible with the surrounding employment uses in terms of car parking, access, noise, odour and other amenity concerns.

New development and redevelopment within the site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • The site should be configured around a legible street pattern which incorporates key views of the waterfront and provides good walking and cycling environments.
  • Residential development should be designed to densities of between 40 and 90 dwellings per hectare.
  • A central transport node with sheltered bus waiting facilities should be provided within the site close to the proposed primary school.
  • Development should provide active frontages along Waveney Drive.
  • Employment development should consider neighbouring residential uses and landscaping and buffers should be employed to avoid amenity issues.
  • Development should provide a continuous east-west waterfront pedestrian and cycle route across the site. Signage and wayfinding measures should be provided to help navigation between the seafront and the Broads. The waterfront path should include a multifunctional hard surfaced public space.
  • Development should facilitate the provision of a pedestrian and cycle bridge over Lake Lothing at the Brooke Peninsula. The bridge should be an opening bridge and should not cause an unacceptable adverse impact upon navigation and other harbour operations.
  • A new access road from the Jeld Wen Playing Fields is required to serve the majority of the residential development.
  • A network of children's play areas totalling 1,800sqm should be provided in accessible, well-overlooked locations throughout the residential parts of the site.
  • Development should facilitate the enhancement of the Brooke Yachts and Jeld Wen Mosaic County Wildlife Site to mitigate the loss of part of the site which is needed to facilitate the construction of the access road. A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • Development should support and enhance ecological networks throughout the site.
  • Slipways on the Brooke Peninsula should be retained and made available for use by the public and businesses.
  • A full site investigation report assessing the risk of ground contamination should be submitted with any planning application.
  • All new development will be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. A flood evacuation plan and details of mitigation measures to the satisfaction of the Council's Emergency Planners must be submitted with any planning application.

A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.

Development on the site should also be in conformity with the guidance and the outline masterplan detailed in the Sustainable Urban Neighbourhood and Kirkley Waterfront Development Brief. Revisions may be made to the Development Brief through a revised Supplementary Planning Document or as part of a Neighbourhood Plan.

On-site infrastructure, including the primary school, pre-school provision, playing field and pedestrian/cycle bridge will be secured and funded through Section 106 planning obligations. More details are included in Appendix 1.

East of England Park

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Destination park

2.42 Lowestoft is home to Britain's most easterly point, Ness Point. However, the point has poor connections and is surrounded by impermeable industrial land. There is existing open space to the north of Ness Point which is connected to Ness Point by the promenade and has heritage value with a collection of historic fishing net drying racks which form part of the North Lowestoft Conservation Area. The space also has ecological value. However, this space is underutilised and poorly maintained.

2.43 The Area Action Plan recognised the potential to create a major new contemporary park adjacent to the seafront walkway to celebrate the eastern most point of Britain and to provide a new cultural/events space for Lowestoft and connect to the existing public areas around the Ravine to the historic High Street by way of the Scores. Policy WLP2.5 seeks to continue the approach of the Area Action Plan in revitalising this area and making it a destination park and tourist destination.

2.44 Since the preparation of the Area Action Plan, engagement has taken place with the local community to further help shape proposals for the area. In April 2017 it was announced that £1 million funding had been secured to help deliver the park through the Coastal Communities Fund.

Policy WLP2.5 - East of England Park

Land comprising the East of England Park (7.87 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated as a destination park together with supporting uses, including:

  • A pavilion/café/orientation facilities at Ness Point;
  • Landmark structure/sculpture to celebrate the most easterly point; and
  • Play facilities.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • Protect and incorporate the historic net drying racks into improvements to the open space.
  • Provide landscaping and public art to soften the visual impact of the Birds Eye Factory.
  • New steps and ramps should be provided from the open space on to the promenade.
  • High quality lighting, sculptures and banners should animate the seafront.
  • Provide signage and wayfinding measures to integrate the park with the wider town.
  • Integrate landscaping with the North Denes Caravan Park.
  • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • Proposals should be accompanied by a Heritage Impact Assessment which appraises the impact on the conservation area including, the Scores and the High Street

Western End of Lake Lothing

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Residential development, marine-focused employment development and tourism

2.45 The Western End of Lake Lothing refers to the area to the south west of Lake Lothing between Stanley Road and South Elmham Terrace. The area is currently characterised by small scale industrial uses and under-utilised land. There is limited public access to the area and the waterfront in this location. The site relates well to the neighbouring WLP2.4 site, however, it has a different character made up of smaller parcels of land with a distinctive maritime character. The vision for the site is to complement and integrate with the proposals on the neighbouring site and provide a mix of housing and maritime related uses and open up the waterfront.

2.46 Much of the site is already developed, so most new development will involve redevelopment of existing buildings. Access to the site is currently a constraint, and further intensification of development off South Elmham Terrace is unlikely to be suitable unless improvements to visibility splays are improved. There is an opportunity through redevelopment to provide better access from Crompton Road and Stanley Road.

2.47 The Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan allocated this site for mixed use development including waterfront tourism, small scale residential development of 57 homes and employment development. Since the adoption of the Area Action Plan planning permission has been given for 44 homes off South Elmham Terrace. However, the development of these homes is conditional on improvements to South Elmham Terrace. Policy WLP2.6 continues to allocate this area of land for 57 homes, together with improved waterfront employment premises and waterfront tourist uses.

2.48 Given the recent uses on the site, there is a risk of ground contamination. Therefore, a full site investigation report should be submitted with any planning application which includes reports on intrusive surveys, a risk assessment and remediation method statement.

2.49 A Concept Statement for the site has been adopted as a Supplementary Planning Document. The document provides further detail to guide development of the site and planning applications should be in accordance with the guidance and the outline masterplan. The Concept Statement will be kept under review and may be amended in line with Policy WLP2.6 to take into account changing circumstances. This review could take place through a revised Supplementary Planning Document or as part of a Neighbourhood Plan.

Policy WLP2.6 - Western End of Lake Lothing

Land comprising the Western End of Lake Lothing (3.83 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for mixed-use development including:

  • Approximately 57 dwellings;
  • Marine-focused employment; and
  • Tourism uses.

New development and redevelopment within the site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • Development should maximise the potential of the waterfront position.
  • Development should allow for public views of and access to the waterfront.
  • Development should provide a central area of open space comprising a local equipped area for play which is well overlooked.
  • Development should be planned in accordance with the sequential approach to flood risk within the site, with more vulnerable development focused on the parts of the site with the least flood risk.
  • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • A full site investigation report assessing the risk of ground contamination should be submitted with any planning application.
  • All new development will be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. A flood evacuation plan and details of mitigation measures to the satisfaction of the Council's Emergency Planners must be submitted with any planning application.

Former Battery Green Car Park

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Retail and leisure development

2.50 The Former Battery Green Car Park occupies a prominent site facing on to the A12 at Battery Green Road. The former car park has recently closed due to serious structural deterioration and low demand from visitors and is currently being demolished.

2.51 The site, which sits within the town centre, offers a prime site for redevelopment for town centre uses. The 0.87 hectare site could accommodate a number of the development needs identified in the Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment (2016) including new comparison and convenience retail, leisure uses such as a cinema and a town centre hotel. Development of this type on this site will have a significant positive impact on the vitality and viability of Lowestoft Town Centre. At this stage the exact mix and level of development has not been established. Policy WLP2.7 therefore allocates the site for a mix of potential town centre uses. There may also be potential for residential development (falling within either use classes C2 or C3) as part of a mixed use scheme. However, this use should be ancillary and any planning application for the site which includes residential uses must be supported by information which demonstrates there will be no significant impacts on residential amenity from industrial and port related activities taking place on the adjacent PowerPark site.

2.52 Given the prominent location of the site, redevelopment will need to be carefully planned and designed. It will be particularly important to establish visible links and connections to the main pedestrianised London Road North and the Marina street. This will ensure the wider town centre will benefit from the development from linked trips. An active frontage should be provided along Gordon Road to ensure the street provides a welcoming link between the town centre, the development and employment uses on the PowerPark. Large blank walls should be avoided adjacent to public thoroughfares to ensure the development is attractive from main public viewpoints.

2.53 The site is opposite the PowerPark. In line with Policy WLP2.2, development should be designed to minimise conflicts between land uses in the allocation and the port area and ensure development does not result in unreasonable restrictions being placed on the operations of the port or existing businesses within the PowerPark area.

2.54 The site is opposite the Grade II listed St Margaret's House. The redevelopment of this site provides an opportunity to enhance the setting of this building.

Policy WLP2.7 - Former Battery Green Car Park

The Former Battery Green Car Park (0.87 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for a comprehensive redevelopment of town centre uses including retail and leisure development falling within Use Classes A1, A2, A3, A4, C1 and D2.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

    • New development should be designed to the highest possible architectural standard and create a landmark building for the town.
    • Visual links and connections should be provided to London Road North and the Marina street.
    • Blank walls should be avoided adjacent to public viewpoints.
    • An active frontage should be provided along Gordon Road.
    • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.

Former Lowestoft Hospital

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Residential development

2.55 The area to the north west of the town centre currently provides housing which has good links to the town centre and helps support the shops and services the town centre provides. Within this area is the former Lowestoft Hospital which lies between Alexandra Road, Milton Road East and Tennyson Road.

2.56 The former hospital site is proposed for redevelopment for residential uses. The site is a brownfield site with excellent accessibility to the shops and services provided by the town centre. The development of the site therefore has the potential to help support these shops and services as well as ensuring residents do not need to travel far to access day-to-day needs. Given the history of the site, residential accommodation with an element of care such as sheltered housing or extra-care housing (use class C2) will be strongly supported.

2.57 It is considered that the site could accommodate approximately 45 homes. These could take the form of apartments or terraces in converted buildings and new build terraces and apartments. Following detailed appraisal and design there is scope for flexibility in terms of exact number of units.

2.58 Some of the buildings on the site date back to the late Victorian period and early 20th Century and constitute a non-designated heritage asset. The most sensitive part of the site is the south elevation of the original hospital building (which fronts Milton Road East) constructed in 1882 which features an attractive colonnaded facade. The 1927 wing frontage on to Alexandra Road which includes a war memorial is also sensitive. The other frontages onto Tennyson Road and the 1930s frontage onto Alexandra Road to the north of the site are less sensitive but do provide an attractive frontage onto the street.

2.59 Considering the above, any redevelopment should aim to retain and re-use the original 1882 hospital building, the 1927 wing building on Alexandra Road, and the other early 20th Century frontages on Alexandra Road and Tennyson Road where it is viable and feasible to do so. Some degree of openness to the south of the site should be retained so that the principal elevation of the original 1882 hospital building can be appreciated from Milton Road East.

Policy WLP2.8 - Former Lowestoft Hospital

The Former Lowestoft Hospital (0.72 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for a comprehensive residential redevelopment of approximately 45 homes. Residential accommodation with an element of care will be strongly supported.

The site should be developed to a high quality design in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • The 1882 original hospital building, the 1927 wing which fronts on to Alexandra Road and the other early 20th Century frontages on Alexandra Road and Tennyson Road should be retained and re-used as part of any scheme. If it is not viable or feasible to do this, the facades of these buildings should be retained as part of the redevelopment.
  • Part of the site between Milton Road East and the 1882 original hospital building should be retained as public open space so that the south elevation of the hospital building can be appreciated from the highway.

Historic High Street and Scores

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2.60 The historic High Street and Scores form some of the oldest parts of Lowestoft. The area is part of the North Lowestoft Conservation Area and exhibits numerous historic buildings, many of which are listed. However, the quality of the historic environment is under threat from insensitive development, poorly maintained buildings and a lack of investment.

2.61 The area sits within one of the most deprived in Lowestoft and is within the 10% most deprived in the country. The area suffers from numerous social problems including anti-social behaviour, shorter life expectancy and low levels of employment and education.

2.62 The area currently has a number of purposes. The southern end of the High Street around the Triangle Market is part of Lowestoft Town Centre and provides a secondary shopping area and a leisure focus with a number of cafés, restaurants and pubs. The area of the High Street to the north of Rant Score has more of a local shopping centre character, providing day-to-day provision to the surrounding residential properties. However, there are a number of unique shops and a couple of pubs and a restaurant which serve a wider population and visitors to the area.

2.63 The Scores have a more mixed residential and employment purpose.

2.64 As detailed above, the objectives for this area are for heritage led-regeneration which enhances the heritage experience of this area and supports the existing shops, cafés and restaurants. The Council aims for the area to have a strong heritage narrative with improved connectivity between the town centre, the High Street and the East of England Parks including Ness Point.

2.65 The area falls within the recently designated North Lowestoft Heritage Action Zone. The key aims of the five year scheme are to restore the old High Street's historic character for the people who live there and to boost tourism. Work will include providing quality spaces for the community, re-connecting the old town to modern Lowestoft, and bringing under-used and vacant land and property back into use for housing and retail.

2.66 To achieve a better mix of tenures in the area and to encourage investment which will help improve the appearance of the area, the Council will proactively support new open market residential development within the Historic High Street and Scores area.

2.67 Proposals for development within the area should be in accordance with Policy WLP8.39 on Conservation Areas and have regard to the North Lowestoft Conservation Area Appraisal. Historic shop fronts are a key part of the character of the conservation area and these should be retained and enhanced as part of development. Guidance on shop front design is found in the Built Heritage and Design Supplementary Planning Document. Proposals for development affecting designated heritage assets such as the numerous listed buildings in the area will be determined in accordance with policy set out in the National Planning Policy Framework. Part of the High Street (up to Rant Score) is within Lowestoft Town Centre as defined by Policy WLP8.18. The High Street frontage up to Crown Street East on the west side and Mariners Score on the east side is defined as a secondary retail frontage under Policy WLP8.19. Relevant development proposals and changes of use should be in accordance with these policies. The Scores area to the south of Rant Score is identified as an Existing Employment Area under Policy WLP8.12. Proposals in this area should be in accordance with that policy.

Policy WLP2.9 - Historic High Street and Scores Area

The Historic High Street and Scores Area is defined on the Policies Map.

The Historic High Street and Scores should be conserved and enhanced through heritage-based regeneration to complement the town centre, provide local shopping services and facilities and support local tourism and links between the town centre and the East of England Park.

Proposals to enhance and expand the Triangle Market will be supported.

New development should enhance connections and legibility between the High Street and the East of England Park and provide environmental improvements.

Changes to shop fronts should respect the historic character of the area and have regard to the guidance within the Built Heritage and Design Supplementary Planning Document.

New open market housing of exceptional design will be supported in the historic High Street and Scores area where it does not individually or cumulatively, have a significant adverse impact on the historic character, appearance, retail function, viability and vitality of the area. Conversion of ground floor premises in A class uses to open market housing will only be permitted where the original shop front is retained and enhanced.

A design guide will be prepared either as part of a Neighbourhood Plan or a Supplementary Planning Document to ensure new development within the area is of exceptional urban design and enhances the historic environment of the area

Inner Harbour Port Area

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2.68 The Port of Lowestoft, currently owned by Associated British Ports, is an important regional and local asset. The Port services traffic to and from Northern Europe, Scandinavia and the Baltic States. The Port has experienced a significant increase in traffic in recent years and offers a wide range of facilities for container, bulk and general cargo handling. Increasingly it is also servicing the emerging offshore renewables sector as well as the established oil and gas sector.

2.69 The Inner Harbour Port Area as defined on the Policies Map covers the part of the Port of Lowestoft on the banks of Lake Lothing. It also contains South Quay which is just to the west of the Bascule Bridge on Lake Lothing. South Quay is a heavy lifting quay in separate private ownership and is valuable in supporting offshore renewables, engineering, oil and gas sectors and Sizewell.

2.70 Policy WLP2.10 protects and supports the enhancement of these areas for uses associated with the Port. The Inner Harbour Port Area is located in close proximity to other uses such as residential, retail and leisure uses. It is therefore important to minimise the conflict between these uses.

Policy WLP2.10 - Inner Harbour Port Area

The Inner Harbour Port Area is defined on the Policies Map.

Within the Inner Harbour Port Area land and buildings will be retained in port and other associated uses, with the exception of redevelopment or other land use changes required to accommodate the delivery and construction of the Lake Lothing Third Crossing in the form approved by a development consent order made under the Planning Act 2008. Proposals involving the redevelopment or change of use of existing premises, to uses not related to the port or the Lake Lothing Third Crossing as so approved will not be permitted.

New development within the Inner Harbour Port Area should ensure that technology, equipment, and business practices are utilised in order to minimise noise and other amenity issues.

New development on South Quay should include landscaping and public realm treatments which improve the appearance of this key gateway to the town centre.

New development next to, opposite, or in close proximity to the Inner Harbour Port Area should ensure potential conflicts are mitigated through the layout, use and environmental credentials of new buildings. Developers should liaise with businesses and port operators to ensure that potential conflicting uses are addressed prior to any application for planning permission. New development should not result in unreasonable restrictions being placed on the operations of the port or existing businesses within the Inner Port Harbour Area.

Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre

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2.71 Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre is located around Bridge Road in Oulton Broad. The area is shared between the Broads Authority and Waveney District Council's Local Planning Authority areas. There are around 50 retail units currently in operation (2016 monitoring data).

2.72 The Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment (2016) and annual monitoring suggests Oulton Broad should continue to be identified as a 'District Centre' where shops and services will be protected and prevented from changing to other uses. Planning Policy Statement 4 (PPS4) 'Planning for Sustainable Economic Growth' (now deleted), defines District Centres as a 'group of shops, separate from the town centre, usually containing at least one supermarket or superstore, and a range of non-retail services, such as banks, building societies and restaurants, as well as local public facilities such as a library'. There is currently no definition for District Centres in the National Planning Policy Guidance or the Framework.

2.73 The Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment (2016) says that the area has a relatively good mix of independent stores for its size but an under provision of banks and building societies. It was principally identified as a 'top-up' food shopping destination in the household survey. The assessment suggests that there is potential to increase the convenience food offer as well as increase the number of cafés and restaurants to cater for the needs of the local population and the wider tourist market. The assessment also identifies the potential to increase the linkages between the centre and the Broads.

2.74 The increase in the number of takeaways has been a cause for concern in Oulton Broad, with late opening times often being associated with anti-social behaviour that harms the amenity of local residents and the environmental quality of the area. Concern has been raised that a continuation of this trend could reduce the centre's retail provision making it less attractive for local residents and thereby potentially affecting the viability of the remaining shops.

2.75 Policy WLP2.11 is included within both the Waveney District Council Local Plan and the Broads Local Plan to reflect the centre's location across both planning authority areas. The policy intends to protect the existing shopping and service offer in the centre and promote new restaurants and cafés where they would not undermine the viability of the centre. The policy resists changes of use to A4 (drinking establishments) and A5 (hot food takeaways) in order to address amenity concerns.

2.76 It is acknowledged that some changes of use can take place without planning permission under the Permitted Development Order 2015 which allows some flexibility of uses within the area (dependent on size, final proposed land use and whether the site is located in a conservation area or not). The inability of the Council to control such proposals highlights the need to give particular scrutiny to proposals that continue to require the submission of a planning application.

Policy WLP2.11 - Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre

Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre is identified on the Policies Map.

New Town Centre Use Development (falling within use classes A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, C1, D2 and B1a) will be permitted within the Oulton Broad District Centre where the scale and function of the development is consistent with the role of the District Centre and would not impact on the vitality and viability of Lowestoft Town Centre.

Within the Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre proposals for changes of use of ground floor premises from use classes A1 (retail) and A2 (financial and professional services) to A4 (drinking establishments), A5 (hot food takeaways) and other non-A Class uses will not be permitted.

The following changes of use of ground floor premises will only be permitted where either cumulatively or individually they have no significant adverse impact on the character, retail function and vitality and viability of the centre, residential amenity including noise, fumes, smell and litter, highway safety, parking and community safety:

    • From use classes A1 (retail) and A2 (financial and professional services) to A3 (restaurants and cafés).
    • From any use other than use classes A1 (retail) or A2 (financial and professional services) in the Oulton Broad District Shopping Centre to use classes A3 (restaurants and cafés), A4 (drinking establishments) and A5 (hot food takeaways).

Kirkley District Shopping Centre

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2.77 Kirkley District Shopping Centre, known locally as Kirkley Village Centre, is located along London Road South between Parade Road South and Lorne Park Road. There are currently nearly 80 units within the area in retail or leisure uses. The centre currently has a good range of independent stores and cafés. The smaller convenience stores in the centre predominantly cater for day-to-day and top-up shopping.

2.78 The Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment (2016) and annual monitoring suggests Kirkley should continue to be identified as a 'District Centre' where shops and services will be protected and prevented from changing to other uses. The assessment suggests that there is potential to increase the convenience food offer as well as increase the number of cafés and restaurants to cater for the needs of the local population and the wider tourist market.

2.79 A key objective for this area is to increase the use of the centre by tourists visiting the nearby seafront. A greater range of restaurants and cafés and signage from the seafront will help support this.

2.80 Policy WLP2.12 intends to protect the existing shopping and service offer in Kirkley and promote new restaurants and cafés where they would not undermine the viability of the centre.

2.81 It is acknowledged that some changes of use can take place without planning permission under the Permitted Development Order 2015 which allows some flexibility of uses within the area (dependent on size, final proposed land use and whether the site is located in a conservation area or not). The inability of the Council to control such proposals highlights the need to give particular scrutiny to proposals that continue to require the submission of a planning application.

Policy WLP2.12 - Kirkley District Shopping Centre

Kirkley District Shopping Centre is identified on the Policies Map.

New Town Centre Use Development (falling within use classes A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, C1, D2 and B1a) will be permitted within the Kirkley District Centre where the scale and function of the development is consistent with the role of the District Centre and would not impact on the vitality and viability of Lowestoft Town Centre.

Within the Kirkley District Shopping Centre proposals for changes of use of ground floor premises from use classes A1 (retail) and A2 (financial and professional services) to A4 (drinking establishments), A5 (hot food takeaways) and other non-A class uses will not be permitted.

The following changes of use of ground floor premises will only be permitted where either cumulatively or individually they have no significant adverse impact on the character, retail function and vitality and viability of the centre, residential amenity including noise, fumes, smell and litter, highway safety, parking and community safety:

  • From use classes A1 (retail) and A2 (financial and professional services) to A3 (restaurants and cafés).
  • From any use other than use classes A1 (retail) or A2 (financial and professional services) in the Kirkley District Shopping Centre to use classes A3 (restaurants and cafés), A4 (drinking establishments) and A5 (hot food takeaways).

Other Strategic Site Allocations

Figure 9 - Strategic site allocations in north Lowestoft

figure 9

Policy

Location

Allocation

WLP2.13

North of Lowestoft Garden Village

Residential development, employment development, primary school and local shops

WLP2.14

Land North of Union Lane, Oulton

Residential development

WLP2.15

Land between Hall Lane and Union Lane, Oulton

Residential development

WLP2.18

Land at Mobbs Way, Oulton

Employment development

WLP2.20

Gunton Park, off Old Lane, Corton

Residential development

© Crown copyright [and database rights] 2019 OS100042052

    • Figure 10 - Strategic site allocations in south Lowestoft

figure 10

Policy

Location

Allocation

WLP2.16

Land South of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham

Mixed use including residential development, primary school, country park, allotments, local shops and community centre

WLP2.17

Land at South Lowestoft Industrial Estate

Employment development

WLP2.19

Oakes Farm, Beccles Road, Carlton Colville

Sports and leisure

© Crown copyright [and database rights] 2019 OS100042052

North of Lowestoft Garden Village

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Residential development, employment development, primary school and local shops

2.82 This broad area of land comprising approximately 71 hectares sits to the east of the A47 (formerly A12) to the north of Lowestoft within the parish of Corton. The development of this area is a longer term ambition of the Local Plan and development is not expected to start until after 2026. The site is allocated for approximately 1,300 new homes and 8 hectares of employment land together with community facilities, including a 2 form entry primary school, open space and a local shopping centre. During the life of this Local Plan (2014-2036) it is expected that approximately 740 homes will be delivered with the remainder being constructed between 2036 and 2044.

2.83 Out of all the areas north of Lowestoft with the potential for future major development, this area of land will likely have the most limited impact on the landscape. The site is mostly flat with the A47 to the west and the water treatment works to the north which undermines the existing quality of landscape in this location. The site has access to the strategic road network which provides regular bus services between Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth. The development is of a scale that can provide most services to cater for day-to-day needs. It is also of a scale which can deliver a significant amount of land for new businesses which can provide employment for future residents on the site and further afield in Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth.

2.84 It may be possible to access initial phases of development from Corton Long Lane. However, longer term there will be a need for a new or improved access from the A47 trunk road. The addition of an extra junction on to the A47 may cause increased safety issues along the trunk road. Therefore, mitigation would be required to increase safety elsewhere along the stretch of road.

2.85 Community facilities including the primary school and local shopping centre should be provided within a central location on the site.

2.86 Waveney has an ageing population and the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (2017) identified a significant need for new sheltered and extra care housing and new care homes. This large site, which will likely be delivered by a number of developers provides an opportunity to deliver a retirement community comprising a care home and/or a proportion of extra care/sheltered dwellings. These will form part of the total housing allocated on the site. The development should be designed utilising dementia friendly design principles (see Policy WLP8.31 on Lifetime Design).

2.87 Delivery of new employment development can often be challenging due to the financial viability of development. Housing development on the site should help facilitate the delivery of employment development.

2.88 The site should be designed using garden city principles5 with significant amounts of landscaping, tree planting and green infrastructure. The development of the area should exhibit exceptional urban design. It should score particularly well against Building for Life criteria (see Policy WLP8.29). Developers are encouraged to seek Built for Life Quality Mark for housing development on the site. The site should be designed to ensure the identity of the existing village of Corton is maintained. This should involve leaving an area of the site to the south near Corton Long Lane, including Doles Wood, undeveloped.

2.89 A detailed masterplan will need to be prepared to guide the development of this site. The masterplan will need to set out how the scheme will meet garden city principles and exhibit excellent urban design. The masterplan will need to set out detailed proposals for access, phasing, the distribution of land-uses across the site and the approach to infrastructure delivery. This should be prepared either as part of a Neighbourhood Plan or as a Supplementary Planning Document. No development will be permitted on the site until the masterplan has been prepared.

2.90 The site has a high potential for archaeology and any planning applications must be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts. The site may be the home of the former medieval village of Thorpe. It is suggested that this may have been located to the north of Doles Wood to the south of the site. As such some archaeological work should be undertaken to inform the masterplan. This could involve, field walking and metal detecting, geophysical survey and possibly trenching.

2.91 The site should help facilitate an off-road pedestrian and cycle link between the built up area of Lowestoft and Hopton to the north. There is extensive movement of commuters between Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft and the provision of a continuous off-road cycle link will help encourage modal shift.

5 Information on garden city principles can be found in the glossary and at http://www.tcpa.org.uk/pages/garden-cities.html

Policy WLP2.13 - North of Lowestoft Garden Village

Land comprising the North of Lowestoft Garden Village (approximately 71 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for a comprehensive mixed use development including:

  • Approximately 1,300 new dwellings;
  • Retirement community comprising a care home / nursing home and extra care and/or sheltered dwellings;
  • 2 form entry primary school and a pre-school setting (2.2 hectares);
  • A local shopping centre comprising a convenience store, cafés, a pre-school setting, community centre and other local services;
  • Playing field, play areas and green infrastructure; and
  • 8 hectares of employment development (falling under use classes B1, B2 and B8)

A masterplan should be prepared and adopted as either a Supplementary Planning Document or as part of a Neighbourhood Plan. No development will be permitted on this site until the masterplan has been prepared.

The masterplan should:

  • Set out detailed arrangements for access on to the site.
  • Set out the distribution of land-uses across the site. The primary school, local shopping centre and retirement community should be located centrally on the site.
  • Ensure the identity of the existing village of Corton is maintained.
  • Ensure there is no adverse effect on the operation of the water treatment works.
  • Set out the approach to phasing of development across the site.
  • Set out detailed urban design guidance and demonstrate how the principles of garden city developments can be met on the site.
  • Include an assessment of ecology and identify key ecological networks and habitats to be preserved and enhanced through the development.
  • Be informed by evidence of archaeology.
  • Set out the approach to infrastructure delivery on the site.

Housing development on the site should help facilitate the delivery of the employment land.

On-site infrastructure and specific site related infrastructure, including the primary school, pre-school provision, community centre and open space will be secured and funded through Section 106 planning obligations. More details are in Appendix 1

Land North of Union Lane, Oulton

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Residential development

2.92 The site (5.70 hectares) consists of undeveloped land on Parkhill and part of the site of the former Lothingland Hospital to the rear. The part of the site of the former Lothingland Hospital is being used informally for storage of building materials and equipment at present.

2.93 The site has good access to existing services and facilities in Oulton and in the future will have good access to the primary school, community centre, medical centre and retail facilities which are to be provided on the Woods Meadow development. The site is also in close proximity to the Mobbs Way Employment Area. There are bus stops nearby which provide access to the town centre. Development of the site is expected to have a limited impact on the landscape and the site is not used for agriculture.

2.94 Vehicular access is possible from Parkhill. Union Lane is a narrow road of a rural character and is not appropriate to provide vehicular access to this site. Pedestrian and cycle access should be provided to Union Lane. The pavement on Parkhill stops short of the potential access point to the site by some 200 metres. The pavement should be extended to the access point of the site.

2.95 The site should be developed at an average density of 30 dwellings per hectare. The area around Union Lane has a more rural character therefore development on the northern and western parts of the site should be of a lower density with greater spacing between detached buildings and more generous back gardens.

2.96 The site is not within the catchment of any equipped children's play space. Therefore, the development should include the provision of a local equipped area for play, approximately 0.4 hectares in size.

2.97 The level of new development within Oulton is likely to generate a need for a new pre-school setting. The preference for this would be in an existing primary school or in a location close to other services and facilities provided in the area. However, if there is no suitable, available site at the time of a planning application, and there is still a need for a setting, it may be necessary for a new setting to be included on this site. A new setting will require 0.09 hectares of land and therefore should not impact upon the amount of development achievable on the site.

2.98 Due to the overgrown nature of parts of the site, an ecological assessment will be required to support any planning application on the site. Suffolk Wildlife Trust have completed an initial survey on the site and found some parts of the site provide suitable habitats for a number of species. The survey recommended further assessments including breeding birds, barn owls, reptiles and bats.

2.99 Given the recent uses on the former Lothingland Hospital site, there is a risk of ground contamination. Therefore, a full site investigation report should be submitted with any planning application which includes reports on intrusive surveys, a risk assessment and remediation method statement.

2.100 The north western part of the site is a historic burial ground associated with the former Oulton Workhouse. Development will need to avoid this part of the site and should enhance the site of the burial ground. This could include providing a commemoration on the site and interpretation boards detailing the history of the burial ground and the Oulton Workhouse.

Policy WLP2.14 - Land North of Union Lane, Oulton

Land north of Union Lane, Oulton (5.70 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for a residential development of approximately 150 dwellings.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site-specific criteria:

  • The site will be developed at a density of approximately 30 dwellings per hectare.
  • Vehicular access should be off Parkhill. An additional pedestrian and cycle access should be provided on to Union Lane. The pavement on Parkhill should be extended to the site entrance.
  • A play space equivalent to a local equipped area for play of approximately 0.4 hectares in size should be provided.
  • If needed at the time of the planning application, 0.09 hectares of land on the site should be reserved for a new pre-school setting.
  • A full site investigation report assessing the risk of ground contamination should be submitted with any planning application.
  • Development should avoid impacts on and enhance the historic burial ground.
  • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
  • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.

If required, land for the pre-school setting will be transferred to the Council in accordance with the payment in kind provisions of Regulation 73 of the Community Infrastructure Regulations 2010 (as amended)

Land Between Hall Lane and Union Lane, Oulton

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Residential development

2.101 This site (6.37 hectares) sits between Hall Lane and Union Lane in the parish of Oulton on the outskirts of the built-up area of Lowestoft. The southern part of the site fronting on to Hall Lane is currently used as a small paddock. The northern part of the site is currently arable fields.

2.102 The site has good access to existing services and facilities in Oulton and in the future will have good access to the primary school, community centre, medical centre and retail facilities which are to be provided on the Woods Meadow development. The site is also in close proximity to the Mobbs Way Employment Area. There are bus stops nearby which provide access to the town centre. Development of the site is expected to have a limited impact on the landscape and is on Grade 3 agricultural land.

2.103 Vehicular access is possible from Hall Lane. Union Lane, being narrower and less suitable for through traffic, could provide a secondary vehicular access subject to demonstration that safe and suitable access could be provided for all users, including those accessing the Public Rights of Way network to the north and west. Pedestrian and cycle access should be provided to Union Lane and Hall Lane.

2.104 The level of new development within Oulton is likely to generate a need for a new pre-school setting. The preference for this would be in an existing primary school or in a location close to other services and facilities provided in the area. However, if there is no suitable, available site at the time of a planning application, and there is still a need for a setting, it may be necessary for a new setting to be included on this site. A new setting will require 0.09 hectares of land and therefore should not impact upon the amount of development achievable on the site.

2.105 The site is close to and partly falls within the setting of the Grade II* listed Manor House. As such a heritage impact assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application. An important aspect in protecting the setting will be preserving the rural character of the area and specifically an undeveloped link between the Manor House and the wider countryside to the north-west. In doing this care will be needed when providing access from Hall Lane to ensure associated infrastructure does not urbanise the rural setting. This will include retaining a rural connection each side of the site entrance, keeping lighting to a minimum and having much lower density development in the vicinity of the access. Extensions to the footpath on Hall Lane should be preferably kept to the south side of the road with careful consideration given to the siting of pedestrian crossings. The scale, massing, density and layout of the development will need to be designed sensitively to reflect the setting, drawing on the findings of a detailed heritage impact assessment. Existing field boundary treatment should be retained and enhanced to the south of the site.

2.106 The site has a high potential for archaeology and any planning application must be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

2.107 There are a number of trees on the site and hedgerows between the fields which make up the site and along the Hall Lane and Union Lane frontages. Trees and hedgerows on the site should be retained and incorporated into the layout of the development except where they need to be removed to allow for access.

2.108 Hall Lane and Union Lane currently provide an attractive transition from the suburban character of Oulton to the more rural character to the west heading towards Camps Heath. Development on this site should maintain this transition.

2.109 The site is not within the catchment of any open space provision for toddlers. As such a Local Area for Play should be provided on the site. This open space should be 0.04 hectares in size.

Policy WLP2.15 - Land Between Hall Lane and Union Lane, Oulton

Land between Hall Lane and Union Lane, Oulton (6.37 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for a residential development of approximately 190 dwellings.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • The site will be developed at a density of approximately 30 dwellings per hectare.
  • Vehicular access should be primarily off Hall Lane. A secondary vehicular access could be provided off Union Lane subject to demonstration that the access is safe and suitable. A pedestrian and cycle access should be provided on to Union Lane. The pavement on Hall Lane should be extended to the site entrance.
  • A play space equivalent to a local area for play of approximately 0.04 hectares in size should be provided.
  • If needed at the time of the planning application, 0.09 hectares of land on the site should be reserved for a new pre-school setting.
  • A heritage impact assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • The development should be designed to avoid harm to the setting of the Grade II* listed Manor House. The design should ensure a link remains between the Manor House and the fields to the north west.
  • The design of the development should complement the transition from suburban to rural character along Hall Lane and Union Lane.
  • Natural features on the site such as the pond, trees and hedgerows should be retained and incorporated into the layout of the development.
  • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
  • Any planning application is to be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

If required, land for the pre-school setting will be transferred to the Council in accordance with the payment in kind provisions of Regulation 73 of the Community Infrastructure Regulations 2010 (as amended).

Land South of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham

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Mixed use including residential development, primary s
chool, country park, allotments and local shops

2.110 The site (54.88 hectares) comprises a number of arable fields south of The Street in Carlton Colville and Gisleham.

2.111 The site is a logical extension to the existing built up area. The overall sensitivity of the landscape is low and development could improve the existing exposed edge of the settlement around the Ullswater development. The site has good access to employment opportunities in South Lowestoft Industrial Estate and the nearby retail facilities.

2.112 A development of 900 homes on this site provides the opportunity to deliver a new primary school in a more central location serving pupils in the south Lowestoft and Carlton Colville area. This will help reduce the need to travel to the existing Carlton Colville Primary School in the future. Additionally, the site provides an opportunity to deliver parking and drop-off space for parents at the existing Carlton Colville Primary School to relieve pressure on the existing streets around the school. Parking could be shared with the proposed country park. The site also provides an opportunity to provide safe pedestrian and cycle access to the existing school.

2.113 Waveney has an ageing population and the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (2017) identified a significant need for new sheltered and extra care housing and new care homes. This large site, which will likely be delivered by a number of developers provides an opportunity to deliver a retirement community comprising a care home and/or a proportion of extra care/sheltered dwellings. These will form part of the total housing allocated on the site. The development should be designed utilising dementia friendly design principles (see Policy WLP8.31 on Lifetime Design).

2.114 The Environment Agency has indicated that the development of land in this location could provide an opportunity to deliver flood risk mitigation measures for the Kirkley Stream. Land on the northern part of the site is within flood zone 3 associated with the Kirkley Stream. Therefore the northern part of the site is required to incorporate flood mitigation as set out in the Lowestoft Flood Risk Management Project. This section of the site should incorporate the needs of flood mitigation, form part of the surface water drainage strategy for the site and should also include the provision of local equipped area for play and allotments. The flood risk mitigation will have the benefit of reducing flood risk to a number of existing properties along The Street. At the earliest practical opportunity developers should discuss the means of integrating the flood mitigation requirements into the development layout and design with Waveney District Council, Suffolk County Council and the Environment Agency.

2.115 A country park should also be provided on the western part of the site. A Scheduled Monument exists on the north western corner of the site. A Heritage Impact Assessment has been prepared which indicates that the open countryside in this location is important to the setting of this heritage asset. The open countryside in this area is also important to the setting of the Grade I listed Church of Holy Trinity, Gisleham. A country park in this location therefore helps retain the setting of these two assets and significantly reduces the level of harm potentially caused by the development on the setting of the assets. A country park will also help reduce pressure from dog walking and recreation on nearby protected habitats such as Kessingland beach. The country park should include a fenced neighbourhood equipped area for play, together with a landscaped area for dog walking and other recreation. It should retain an open character which is important to the setting of the Scheduled Monument and retain views from the monument to the Grade I listed church in Gisleham.

2.116 The southern boundary of the site is very exposed to landscape and it will be important not to create a hard exposed edge, as the current Ullswater development does. Therefore land should be set aside on the southern boundary to allow for hedgerow and tree planting to soften the edge of the development.

2.117 The development of the area should exhibit exceptional urban design. It should score particularly well against Building for Life criteria (see Policy WLP8.29). Developers are encouraged to seek Built for Life Quality Mark for housing development on the site. A slightly higher density of 35 dwellings per hectare is proposed on this site to ensure the viability of infrastructure and affordable housing provision. This also allows for the more effective use of high grade agricultural land. This is a similar net density to the modern residential areas to the north of the site. The north part of the site around the primary school could have a more urban character with higher densities comprising terraced town houses and low-level apartments. The southern and western parts of the site should exhibit a more rural character with lower densities and a greater proportion of 1 and 1.5 storey buildings.

2.118 Vehicular access to the site should be provided from The Street. Concerns have been raised about existing parking on The Street and potential conflict with the increased traffic associated with the development. Therefore the Transport Assessment should investigate this further and consider measures to reduce the level of parking on The Street. This could include providing a parking court on the site for properties on The Street which do not have off-road parking available.

2.119 Two rights of way run through the site, one from Low Farm Drive and one from The Street. The layout of the site should be designed so that these public rights of way can be accommodated in the development and link to the rights of way to the south of the site. Pedestrian access to the site and the proposed new primary school should also be made available from Ullswater and Shaw Avenue.

2.120 The site has a very high potential for archaeology and any planning application must be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

2.121 The site is within a Minerals Consultation Area as defined by Suffolk County Council as the Minerals Planning Authority. As such the County Council will need to be consulted on the planning application. According to the British Geological Survey data there is potential for this to be an exploitable resource. Therefore, any planning application should be supported by evidence which assesses the quality and quantity of sand and gravel resources including the depth of seam, thickness of overburden, and a full grading analysis. Planning applications should also be supported by evidence considering the suitability for prior extraction having regard to the Suffolk Minerals and Waste Local Plan and other material considerations. Should the site be considered suitable for prior extraction, having regard to the evidence submitted together with advice from the Minerals Planning Authority, any planning permission for development will be conditioned to take place in phases which allow for prior extraction of some or all of the economic resource.

2.122 The site is currently home to a successful livery/horse riding business. The development should facilitate the relocation of this business to elsewhere on the landowners holding.

2.123 An illustrative masterplan has been prepared as shown in Figure 11 to show how the requirements of the site allocation policy can be met. Development proposals should have regard to this masterplan. However, it may be necessary to depart from the illustrative masterplan dependent on the results of the archaeological survey if any remains need to be preserved in situ. A more detailed masterplan will be required to be submitted with any outline planning application for the site. The detailed masterplan should be informed by consultation with the community.

Figure 11 - Land south of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham illustrative masterplan

figure 11

Policy WLP2.16 - Land South of The Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham

Land South of the Street, Carlton Colville/Gisleham (54.88 hectares) as defined on the Policies Map is allocated for a comprehensive mixed use development including:

  • Approximately 900 new dwellings;
  • Retirement community comprising a care home / nursing home and/or extra care and/or sheltered dwellings;
  • 2 form entry primary school and a pre-school setting (2.2 hectares);
  • Country park (at least 15 hectares);
  • Allotments, flood mitigation and play space; and
  • Local shops comprising a convenience store.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • The site will be developed at a density of approximately 35 dwellings per hectare. Housing density should be higher to the north of the site close to the primary school and lower towards the west and south of the site.
  • Vehicular access should be off The Street. Pedestrian and cycle accesses should be provided from Ullswater, Shaw Avenue, Low Farm Drive and Gisleham Road.
  • The northern part of the site should not be developed and instead used for flood mitigation in line with the Lowestoft Flood Risk Management Project, surface water drainage and open space including the provision of a local equipped area for play and allotments.
  • The primary school should be provided to the north of the site in an accessible location to the existing community of Carlton Colville as well as the new community.
  • The country park should be located to the west of the site and provide protection to the setting of the Scheduled Monument and Grade I listed Holy Trinity Church. It should include a fenced neighbourhood equipped area for play and an open landscaped area for dog walking and other recreation.
  • A heritage impact assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • Land should be set aside on the southern boundary to allow for hedgerow and tree planting to soften the edge of the development.
  • Existing public rights of way should be accommodated within the development and link to public rights of way to the south of the site.
  • Any planning application should be supported by evidence which assesses the quantity and quality of sand and gravel resources within the site and the suitability of the site for prior extraction. If prior extraction is considered appropriate, development will be conditioned to take place in phases which allow for prior extraction of some or all of the economic resource.
  • The development should facilitate the relocation of the existing horse riding business at Bell Farm to elsewhere on the landowners holding.
  • A detailed masterplan, informed by ongoing engagement with the community, should be prepared and submitted with any full or outline planning application.
  • Existing natural features such as hedgerows, dykes and trees should be retained where possible.
  • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
  • Any planning application is to be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

On-site and specific site related infrastructure, including the primary school, pre-school provision, improvements to Bloodmoor Roundabout, flood risk mitigation and country park will be secured and funded through Section 106 planning obligations. More details are in Appendix 1.

Land at South Lowestoft Industrial Estate

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Employment development

2.124 The site (20 hectares) sits between Hadenham Road and Church Road to the south of South Lowestoft Industrial Estate. The site is currently used for agriculture.

2.125 The site forms part of the Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft Enterprise Zone and was originally allocated in the Site Specific Allocation Development Plan Document in 2011. Prior to that part of the site had planning permission for industrial uses which expired.

2.126 Suffolk County Council is currently developing part of the site off Hadenham Road for a number of small start-up units.

2.127 The site is flat with screening to the west. It is unlikely that development on the site would impact on the landscape given the already detracting features of the existing industrial estate and existing buildings already present on the Church Road frontage. The site has good access on to Hadenham Road and is close to the strategic road network. Future employees will have good access to existing and future retail and leisure facilities located close to the site.

2.128 The Employment Land Needs Assessment (2016) identified that demand for employment land was higher in north Lowestoft. However, there is still likely to be demand in south Lowestoft, particularly given its good links to Sizewell to the south and the existing cluster of businesses present in the area. The existing industrial estate has low levels of vacancies and a good proportion of units remain in employment use (B1, B2, and B8 uses). However, this site allocation is very large and considering the overall need for employment land it is unlikely that all of this site will be developed within the plan period to 2036. However, given the nature of the site and to give flexibility to what parts of the site could come forward, it is considered appropriate to continue to allocate the entire Enterprise Zone area. Furthermore, the land has limited potential for any other uses except for its existing agricultural use.

2.129 Church Road is considered unsuitable to be used for vehicular access. Therefore, access to the site should come from Hadenham Road only. However, pedestrian and cycle access should be provided on to Church Road.

2.130 The site has a high potential for archaeology and any planning application must be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

Policy WLP2.17 - Land at South Lowestoft Industrial Estate

Land at South Lowestoft Industrial Estate (20 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for employment development (falling under use classes B1, B2 and B8).

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

    • Vehicular access should be from Hadenham Road and/or Tower Road only.
    • Cycle and pedestrian access should be provided from Church Road.
    • Landscaping should be provided to the west and south of the site.
    • Landscaping should be provided within the site to provide outdoor areas for use by employees.
    • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
    • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
    • Any planning application is to be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

Land at Mobbs Way, Oulton

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Employment development

2.131 The site (2.80 hectares) is situated at the end of Mobbs Way which is an Existing Employment Area. To the west of the site is the Woods Meadow housing development which is currently under construction.

2.132 The site forms part of the Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft Enterprise Zone and parts of the site benefit from partially implemented historic planning permissions. A small part of the site has already been developed.

2.133 The site is relatively flat and is well screened from the residential development to the north, south and the development under construction to the west. The site is easily accessible from surrounding residential areas and benefits from the existing employment development to the east.

2.134 There is potential for archaeology to be found on the site and any planning application will be subject to a condition requiring a programme of archaeological work.

2.135 Although the site is already screened, further landscaping should be provided along the western and northern boundaries to minimise any noise and disturbance to nearby residential properties.

Policy WLP2.18 - Land at Mobbs Way, Oulton

Land at Mobbs Way, Oulton (2.80 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for employment development (falling under use classes B1, B2 and B8).

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

    • Landscaping should be provided to the west and north of the site.
    • A completed ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
    • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
    • A planning condition relating to archaeological investigation will be attached to any planning permission.

Oakes Farm, Beccles Road, Carlton Colville

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Sports and leisure

2.136 Oakes Farm (30.23 hectares) is a large area of arable farmland stretching from the western boundary of Carlton Colville along the southern edge of the A146.

2.137 The site was originally allocated for sports and leisure development in the Site Specific Allocations Development Plan Document (2011). The site provides an excellent opportunity to provide a comprehensive sports development to meet needs of the existing population and the growing population as identified in the Playing Pitch Assessment (2014).

2.138 Progress has been made on bringing the site forward and a masterplan is being prepared. The development is expected to provide the following facilities together with other commercial sports and leisure activities:

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

  • Full sized 3G football pitch
  • A compact athletics facility
  • Four floodlit tennis courts/netball courts
  • Grass youth football pitches
  • Grass mini soccer pitches
  • Changing facilities (500sqm)
  • Access road and car park for 50 vehicles
  • 400m grass athletics track
  • 3 youth football pitches
  • 4 mini soccer pitches
  • Car park extension for 30 vehicles
  • 3 youth football pitches
  • 4 mini soccer pitches
  • Tarmac perimeter track
  • Car park extension for 20 vehicles


2.139 The sports element of the site will be accommodated on approximately 20.75 hectares on the southern part of the site. An area of land needs to be reserved for any future road scheme to bypass the Barnby bends.

2.140 To enable the delivery of the sports facilities referred to above, approximately 8 hectares of the site is made available for enabling development. This development will release approximately 20.75 hectares for the sports development and provide a financial contribution towards the delivery of the sports facilities. Enabling development should relate well to the sports development to the south and could comprise leisure and commercial uses, tourist uses or a limited amount of residential development necessary to deliver the sports development. Development on this part of the site will not be commenced until the land for sports and leisure use has been made available for use.

2.141 There is a small area of Ancient Woodland on the site (Carlton Grove) which is a County Wildlife Site. This area should be maintained and enhanced and any planning applications for development will require ecological surveys.

2.142 The site has a high potential for archaeology and any planning application must be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.

Policy WLP2.19 - Oakes Farm, Beccles Road, Carlton Colville

Land at Oakes Farm, Beccles Road, Carlton Colville (30.23 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for sports and leisure uses.

The site should deliver at least 20.75 hectares of sports pitches, non-pitch sports and other sports and leisure facilities to relevant standards together with changing facilities and car parking.

Up to approximately 8 hectares of the site, to the north of the site, is to be developed for complementary commercial development to enable the delivery of the sports development. As part of any mixed-use scheme a limited amount of residential development may also be permitted on this land in order to deliver the sports development. Development on this part of the site should not be commenced until the 20.75 hectares of land has been made available for sports and leisure use.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

  • Existing rights of way should be retained.
  • A cycle route should be provided from Wood Lane to Chapel Road.
  • The route of any future A146 Barnby Bypass should be protected.
  • The County Wildlife Site, hedgerows, ditches and trees should be conserved and enhanced through development.
  • The impact of any floodlighting on wildlife and residential amenity should be mitigated.
  • Pitches and other sports facilities should be located in order to minimise amenity impact on neighbouring properties.
  • A landscaping scheme should be prepared to integrate the site within the landscape.
  • An ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
  • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan should be submitted with any planning application.
  • Any planning application is to be supported by the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation, including appropriate fieldwork, and should demonstrate the impacts of development on archaeological remains and proposals for managing those impacts.
  • The route of the existing clean water pipe serving the wider Lowestoft area should be protected

Gunton Park, off Old Lane, Corton

View the location of this site on the map of planning policies


Residential development
and open space

2.143 Gunton Park (3.85 hectares) is the current home of the Lowestoft and Yarmouth Rugby Club. There is a car park and single-storey clubhouse to the east of the site, while the rest of the area consists of flat, grassed playing pitches.

2.144 The site was originally allocated for housing and open space in the Site Specific Allocations Development Plan Document (2011) to help facilitate the relocation of the Lowestoft and Yarmouth Rugby Club to a location where they can improve and expand their facilities. An outline planning application has been submitted, but progress on this application has stalled due to difficulties in securing an alternative site. The Local Plan therefore reallocates the site for the same purpose.

2.145 This site is only being reallocated for housing on the strict condition that an open space, of a greater size and quality is provided in the form of playing pitches for Rugby in another, at least equally accessible, and suitable location for the club. In terms of assessing the quality of replacement provision, regard will be had to the number of pitches provided and the range of facilities provided. Profits from the sale of the land for housing should contribute towards funding this improved facility, but housing development should not take place on the site until an alternative location for playing pitches has been agreed and delivered.

2.146 Some open space has already been lost to development in this area, as the former tennis courts to the northeast of the site have recently been developed for housing. In addition, the open nature of this site contributes to the semi-rural low density character of the area and the gap between the built up area of Lowestoft and the built up area of Corton. Open space also benefits existing residents on Corton Long Lane and Old Lane. This points to a need to protect some open space in this location, and it is therefore not considered appropriate to develop the entire site for housing. An area of publicly accessible open space should be retained on the site.

2.147 The surrounding character of development on the edge of Corton and Lowestoft has a distinctly low density. Therefore a slightly reduced density of 25 dwellings per hectare is considered appropriate in this location.

2.148 The site is located close to the edge of the Lowestoft, and has good access to services and facilities. The Tesco supermarket is within walking distance, and the site is well linked to pedestrian and cycle routes and the public transport network. The footpath that runs along the southern boundary of the site should be maintained to at least its existing width. Vehicular access should preferably be off Old Lane, and improvements to the current access would be required.

Policy WLP2.20 - Gunton Park, off Old Lane, Corton

Land at Gunton Park, off Old Lane, Corton (3.85 hectares) as identified on the Policies Map is allocated for a residential development of approximately 65 dwellings and open space.

The site should be developed in accordance with the following site specific criteria:

    • Development of this site should not take place until a replacement site, of a larger size and higher quality, for the provision of rugby playing pitches and cricket pitches has been agreed and delivered.
    • Vehicular access should be off Old Lane, and improvements to the current access will be required.
    • An area of publicly accessible open space of not less than 1.4 hectares should be provided.
    • The residential part of the site should be developed at a density of 25 dwellings per hectare.
    • An ecological assessment undertaken by a suitably qualified person will be required as part of any planning application.
    • A Transport Statement should be submitted with any planning application